1 877 412-8527

The Northwest Passage – West Greenland to Alaska

Northwest Passage Arctic Cruise Information

  • Silver Cloud (Polar Voyages)
  • Luxury Expedition Ship
  • approx. 240 Capacity
  • 25 Days
  • 2020 View Departure>
    • 2020
    • Aug 21 Fri Offer
  • Price from
  • $38,900
  • I'm Interested

Summary : Join a journey that heads up to the High Canadian Arctic, following the route of several explorers that had looked for the Northwest Passage. During your crossing from Greenland to Alaska, experience the beauty of fjords and crystal clear glaciers. Visit small towns and villages to encounter a fascinating mix of local, Danish, and/or Canadian cultures and discover the emblematic sites of Franklin’s and Amundsen’s attempts to sail through the Northwest Passage. Be on the lookout for polar bears, musk oxen, seals, narwhals and walrus. Throughout the voyage, learn about the history, geology, wildlife and botany of this spectacular area from lecture presentations offered by your knowledgeable onboard Expedition Team.

Activities : Birding, Culture, Hiking, Kayaking, Photography, Triple/Quad Cabins

PRICING

Just-Released Offer

  • Free airfare from select gateways
    (or up to a $1,500 air credit)
  • Save 10% per person
  • Offers may not be combinable; conditions may apply

View offer details

Prices from
$38,900 to $173,000

View All Rates

Itinerary
Day 1
Kangerlussuaq, Greenland

Board the Silver Cloud and set sail on your voyage.

Day 2
Sisimiut, Greenland

Located just north of the Arctic Circle, Sisimiut is the northernmost town in Greenland where the port remains free of ice in the winter. Yet it is also the southernmost town where there is enough snow and ice to drive a dogsled in winter and spring. In Sisimiut, traveling by sled has been the primary means of winter transportation for centuries. In fact, the area has been inhabited for approximately 4,500 years. Modern Sisimiut is the largest business center in the north of Greenland, and is one of the fastest growing Greenlandic cities. Commercial fishing is the lead economy in the town‘s thriving industrial base.

Day 3
Ilulissat, Greenland

Known as the birthplace of icebergs, the Ilulissat Icefjord produces nearly 20 million tons of ice each day. In fact, the word Ilulissat means “icebergs” in the Kalaallisut language. The town of Ilulissat is known for its long periods of calm and settled weather, but the climate tends to be cold due to its proximity to the fjord. Approximately 4,500 people live in Ilulissat, the third-largest town in Greenland after Nuuk and Sisimiut. Some people here estimate that there are nearly as many sled dogs as human beings living in the town that also boasts a local history museum located in the former home of Greenlandic folk hero and famed polar explorer Knud Rasmussen.

Day 4
Uumannaq, Greenland

In the iceberg-laden waters surrounding the remote community of Uummannaq it is common to see whales. This area of Greenland is also known for its huge basalt mountains, and the small hunting and fishing village of Uummannaq rests at the foot of the heart-shaped Uummannaq Mountain, a name that translates to mean “in the shape of a seal’s heart”. The town of over 1,200 people has a granite church and the country’s most northerly ferry terminal. The economy of Uummannaq revolves largely around the halibut/fish-processing factory.

Day 5
At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, or writing home to your loved ones these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 6
Cape York, Greenland

Visit the arctic seascape of Cape York, Greenland. Located on the northwestern coast of Greenland in Baffin Bay, Cape York is an important geographical feature delimiting the Melville Bay at its northwestern end and Kiatassuaq Island at its other end. There is a chain of coastal islands that stretches between the two capes, most notably Meteorite Island, named for the discovery one of the world’s largest iron meteorites in Savissivik, a settlement on the island. The iron from this meteorite attracted Inuit migrating from Arctic Canada who used the metal in making tools and harpoons. Visitors to this region will see iconic drifting blue-white icebergs that are shrinking as the earth temperature rises.

Day 7
Pond Inlet, Canada

Located in northern Baffin Island, Pond Inlet is a small, predominantly Inuit community, with a population of roughly 1,500 inhabitants. In 1818, the British explorer John Ross named a bay in the vicinity after the English astronomer John Pond. Today Pond Inlet is considered one of Canada's "Jewels of the North" thanks to several picturesque glaciers and mountain ranges nearby. Many archaeological sites of ancient Dorset and Thule peoples can be found near Pond Inlet. The Inuit hunted caribou, ringed and harp seals, fish, polar bears, walrus, narwhals, geese, ptarmigans and Arctic hares here, long before European and American whalers arrived to harvest bowhead whales. Pond Inlet is also known as a major center of Inuit art, especially the printmaking and stone carving that are featured in the town’s art galleries.

Day 8
Dundas Harbour, Canada

Dundas Harbour is located in the southeast of Devon Island, Canada’s 6th largest island. It is a forlorn but starkly beautiful spot. The island was first sighted by Europeans in 1616 by the English explorers Robert Bylot and William Baffin. But it did not appear on maps until after explorer William Edward Parry’s exploration in the 1820s. Parry named it after Devon, England. In the local Inuktitut language, the place is called Talluruti, which translates as “a woman’s chin with tattoos on it.” This refers to the deep crevasses and streaks on Devon Island, which from a distance resemble traditional facial tattoos. On land there are remains of a Thule settlement dating back to 1000 A.D., including tent rings, middens and a gravesite. There are also much more recent remains a Royal Canadian Mounted Police outpost. The first post was established in 1924 to monitor and control illegal activities, such as foreign whaling, in the eastern entrance to the Northwest Passage. But conditions were so isolated and severe that the post was abandoned in 1933. It was reopened in 1945, but again closed, this time permanently, in 1951. Today, Devon Island is the largest uninhabited island in the world.

Day 9
Devon Island / Beechy Island, Canada

Devon Island is Canada’s sixth largest island and was first seen by Europeans in the early 17th century. The Thule culture had already settled there many centuries before, and left behind qarmat homes, made of rocks, whale bones, rock and sod walls, and skins for roofs that tell a story of over 800 years of human habitation. Other striking finds in this area are the many fossils of corals, crinoids and nautiloids that can be seen. Just across Lancaster Sound is Prince Leopold Island, a Canadian Important Bird Area, a federally listed migratory bird sanctuary, and a Key Migratory Bird Terrestrial Habitat site with large numbers of Thick-billed Murres, Northern Fulmars and Black-legged Kittiwakes that breed there.


Beechey Island is a small island off the southwest coast of Devon Island, separated by a narrow waterway called the Barrow Strait. Captain William Edward Parry was the first European to visit the island in 1819. His lieutenant, Frederick William Beechey, named the island after his father, the artist William Beechey (1753-1839). Beechey Island played a significant role in the history of Arctic Exploration. During the winter of 1845-46, Sir John Franklin and his men camped on the island as part of their ill-fated quest to find the Northwest Passage. Mummified remains of three of Franklin’s crew were discovered, giving a better understanding of what happened before the disappearance of the expedition. In 1850 Edward Belcher used the island as a base while surveying the area. Later, in 1903, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen stopped at the island at the beginning of his successful voyage in search for the Northwest Passage. Subsequently, Beechey Island has been declared a "Territorial Historic Site" since 1975 by the Northwest Territories government.

Day 10
Day 11
Peel Sound, Canada

Peel Sound is a 30 mile wide, 125 mile long channel separating Prince of Wales Island to the west and Somerset Island to the east. It was named in 1851 by explorer Vice Admiral Horatio Austin in honor of Sir Robert Peel, a former prime minister of Great Britain. Austin, however, was not the first person to sail through the sound. Five years earlier, in 1846, Sir John Franklin had passed through the strait, just before his ships became icebound. Peel Sound is not always open. Several explorers, including Francis Leopold McClintock in 1858 and Allen Young in 1875, were unable to pass because it was blocked by ice.

Day 12
Day 13
Day 14
Day 15
Day 16
Day 17
Day 18
Day 19
Beaufort Sea

Named after Sir Francis Beaufort, the British naval officer whose observation of the wind and sea state resulted in the Beaufort scale, the Beaufort Sea is part of the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska and the Canadian Yukon and Northwest Territories. The Beaufort Sea is frozen for most of the year, only opening a channel near the Canadian and Alaskan shore during the months of August and September, the best time for a transit through the Northwest Passage. Beluga and bowhead whales, seals and polar bears are part of the Beaufort Sea’s potential wildlife sightings.

Day 20
Day 21
At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, or writing home to your loved ones these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 22
Day 23 – 24
At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, or writing home to your loved ones these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 25
Nome, Alaska

Disembark the ship after breakfast.

Notes

Read this itinerary as a guide only; the exact route and program varies according to ice and weather conditions – and the wildlife you encounter. Flexibility is the key to the success of this expedition. ExpeditionTrips is not responsible for itinerary changes.

Travel Insurance:
Although travel insurance is not mandatory to participate in this voyage, ExpeditionTrips strongly recommends Emergency Medical/Evacuation coverage which includes coverage for cancellation, trip disruption, baggage and personal property. Other conditions may apply based on pre-existing conditions. ExpeditionTrips can assist U.S. residents with travel protection options.

Kayaking Program:
Kayaking will be offered complimentary and will run on a first-come-first-serve sign up basis. Guests cannot pre book the kayak tours. Participation requires good physical condition and right of participation is reserved. The kayak guides will make the final determination if a guest is fit to participate. Kayaking will be weather dependent. Minimum age 16. Guests should know how to use a rudder on a kayak.

Photo Studio:
Unique to Silver Cloud, the Photo Studio offers a vibrant, creatively inspiring space where you can not only master the art of digital photography with Masterclasses, but also offers an editing suite where you can print images using state-of-the-art equipment plus a dedicated photo manager.

Included:
Shipboard accommodations; Wi-Fi onboard ship (1x device per guest for Vista-Deluxe Veranda; 2x devices per guest for Medallion-Owner's suites); kayaking; parka; backpack; one voyage highlights DVD per cabin; most meals onboard ship; butler service; most beverages onboard ship; gratuities onboard ship (except spa). Royal, Grand, and Owner’s Suites receive laundry service throughout the voyage as well as dinner for two in La Dame (one evening per voyage) and two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage. Subject to change without notice.

Not Included:
Airfare; transfers and luggage handling; meals on board at La Dame Restaurant unless mentioned above as included; some alcoholic premium beverages; travel insurance; government fees and taxes; visa and passport expenses; gifts and items of a personal nature such as laundry (unless mentioned as included) and spa options; fuel surcharge may apply.

Photos: © Creative Services at Silversea Cruises, © Elliott Neep (polar bear reflection, gull, Bear Island), © Richard Sidey (polar bear with passengers), © Daniela Plaza (walrus)

Would you like to learn more about this trip or request availability?

YES!